mystictongue3

FOREIGN SLAVE TRADE MONUMENTS PROTECTED

In CULTURE, DIASPORA TALK, HOT BUTTON TOPIC, INTERNATIONAL NEWS, THE PEOPLE'S NEWS, TRANS-ATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE on September 15, 2008 at UTC.02.30.
Abolitionist, Writer John Newton

Abolitionist, Writer John Newton

The tomb of the anti-slavery abolitionist, John Newton and writer of the hymn “Amazing Grace” is one among many monoliths protected because of their linkage to the “Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade.”

The International day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition is responsible for England’s restoration & rememberance project of the most horrific crime comitted against humanity. The governments desire to preserve these artifacts is proposed to protect the memory for future generations.

“The headstone erected in Watford for George Edward Doney, a Virginian slave who came to Britain and worked for the Earl of Essex, will also be protected.

As will the tomb at Windermere, Cumbria, of Rasselas Belfield, who was born into slavery in Ethiopia but later escaped from a slave ship and gained his freedom.

The fourth monument, in Abney Cemetery, Stoke Newington, north-east London, to be listed commemorates Joanna Vassa, the daughter of Olaudah Equiano – England’s foremost black abolitionist.”

Olaudah Equiano is an author that wrote about his trials & tribulations during his kidnapping, servitude, and subsequent liberation. He is one the first people to chronicle his experiences as an enslaved African, in fact his story predatres the Amistad.

Olaudah’s given name by his oppressors was Gustavus Vassas a name which implies his station as servant in the language of his oppressors. In reading the autobiography one can’t help but getting swept up in the incredible will power & humility in which he lived.

“Monuments upgraded in importance include Picton House, Kingston upon Thames, which was bought in 1795 by slave Cesar Picton who went on to become a successful coal merchant.

The statue in Bloomsbury Square, London, of MP Charles James Fox, who introduced the resolution on the abolition of the slave trade which was passed by Parliament in 1807, has also been upgraded.”

“These new listings and upgrades show the close and continuing historical and social links that much of our heritage has to the history of slavery both in this country and from around the world,”  said Margaret Hodge, Culture Minister.

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