mystictongue3

N.ever I.gnorant G.ettin G.oals A.ccomplished: My kinda N.I.G.G.A.

In LIFESTYLE on July 22, 2008 at UTC.40.31.

With so much racial tension this year–Hangin’ of a Noose at a Coulumbia University Professor’s office, the Jesse Jackson disparaging comments about Barack Obama, the NYPD shooting & killing of an unarmed man:Sean Bell, the Jena Six unjust persecution, and the Ralph Nader, Bill Clinton, and Geraldine Ferraro’s race-laced comments  about Mr. Obama’s bid for the Presidency — fresh on America’s mind, calling an album “Nigger”  seems to be more sensationalism, propaganda and perhaps a ploy to sell more units. Nas, however, said his intent was to “upend a society that focuses more on pejoratives than the racial plights that spawn them.”

Furthermore, he states; “There’s still so much wrong in the whole world with people — poor people, people of color — I just felt like a nice watch (material success) couldn’t take that away, make me forget about that (A rapper w/ a conscience).  A nice day on a yacht with rich friends couldn’t make me forget about reality, what’s going on,” he said. “That’s why I named the album that (nigger)– not just that the word is horrible, but the history behind the word, and how it relates to me, how it’s affected me, offended me.”

Its good to know that even though his platinum record selling status, the cars, jewelry, and other material accoutrements haven’t softened this dynamic lyricist from using his platform to address ignoble systematic racist regimes. Nas has always been well known for the lyrical content he spit with verbal agility and thought provoking delivery.

According to Nas; “It’s all about the intent and what you mean and how it’s coming off and the reason why you’re saying it. You know, if it’s ill intent, if you’re angry, being ignorant, being meanspirited, saying that word — it means the worst,” he explained. “If you’re just a couple of black guys on the street corner, doesn’t mean it’s a great thing, but it’s not that they’re trying to harm each other when they say it.”

Nas makes a good point whether you agree or not there is a question of context. The context this word is used varies accordingly to who says it. Brothers & sisters use this word interchangebly to refer to family, friend, and associates like its an appendage to the person’s name. A “nigga” can be a noun, verb or an adjective. It has become so interwoven into the vernacular that its virtually impossible to remove it from the lexcion. Still, there are lines of demarcation that some shouldn’t cross when referring to someone as a “nigga” (black english vernacular orB.E.V.); or “Nigger” the denigrating race based term to insult, persecute, and oppress people of color.

The late rapper Tupac Shakur made this distinction when he made the word as it pronounced by people of color (chopping off the ER and replacing it with AH or A)an acronym. The word,to him, now meant {N}ever {I}gnorant {G}ettin {G}oals {A}ccomplished NIGGA respectively.

It is important to draw this distinction because its real and to certain segments even if you’re black and say it, but don’t have the cutural sensitivity you can and will be “beaten down to the ground!” The black community at large are the vanguard whom collectively decide who can and can’t use this term. However, the word should be removed from the mouths of all white people. Why? Because they created this word with evil-intent. Since, it’s so controversial to this day they only skew their intent by using it. You come in my neighborhood saying that smack and you’ll find your head split to the “white meat!!!!”

From the untitled controversial album here are some of the vocal stylings from the self-acclaimed God’s Son. On the song “Testify,” Nas warns that he’s loading a magazine to “send these REDNECK BIGOTS some DEATH in a BAG/CHOKE him OUT with his CONFEDERATE FLAG/I know these DEVILS are MAD.”

He states that; “I really like ‘Testify’ because it’s like a man who’s just frustrated and doesn’t know how to fight. It’s when you feel like there’s no one to call. Who do you call when you’re of the ethnic group that the police have been wiping out for years and the government doesn’t do anything?” Nas asked.

Nas explains his growth on “Project Roach,” crediting a Guyanese anthropologist and literary critic with helping him mature: “I used to worship a certain Queens police murderer/Till I read the words of Ivan Van Sertima/He inserted something in me than made me feel worthier/Now I spit revolution, I’m his hood interpreter.”

On “America,” he suggests, “Too many rappers, athletes and actors/But not enough niggas in NASA/Who gives you the latest dances, trends and fashion?/But when it comes to residuals they look past us.”

On the album, Nas still has an air of militancy, lyrical threats of violence directed toward those who desire to oppress Africans in the Americas. Overall,  the messages and tone seem designed to elevate, inspire and agitate thought thoughout the black community, or to “decry a separate-but-unequal culture that purports to incubate fairness but rarely produces results.”

Advertisements
  1. Nice writing style. Looking forward to reading more from you.

    Chris Moran

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: